Gardening

22 Common Purple Flowers That Can Be Easily Grown In Your Yard

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Using color strategically is essential to creating an effective garden design; purple is a favorite because of its connotations of elegance and royalty. The range of tulips adds excitement, while light lavenders lend a sense of peace.

Purple enhances the overall sophistication by blending well with a variety of colors. Oranges, yellows, and reds add visual interest, while blues, silvers, and whites balance the summer heat with a cooling effect.

1. Lavender

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Growing lavender offers various benefits as it is a low-maintenance flower. This plant thrives in sunlight, and its delicate flowers work well in both fresh and dried arrangements. While native to the Mediterranean with a preference for cool winters and hot, dry summers, hardy lavender varieties have been cultivated to withstand colder winters and higher humidity.

For Northern gardeners, choosing cold-tolerant types or opting for container gardening that allows bringing plants indoors during winter is advisable.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-8
  • Size: 1 to 3 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Season: Summer

2. May Night Salvia

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May Night salvia, a perennial with deep bluish-purple flowers on 2-foot-tall spikes, blooms consistently from May to June, making it a fantastic addition to gardens. It's a versatile plant, fitting well in perennial borders, cottage gardens, butterfly gardens, or wildflower gardens.

Similar to other salvias, it's an excellent choice for landscaping. For optimal results, it's recommended to trim the plants in early spring to stimulate new and healthy growth. 

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-9
  • Size: Varies by species (typically 1 to 3 feet)
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Bloom Season: Spring to fall, depending on the variety

3. Clematis

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Clematis, a rapidly climbing vine belonging to the buttercup family, adds stunning beauty to fences, porches, and trellises. These flowers boast an attractive shape and come in a captivating pastel purple hue, charming anyone who beholds their beauty.

With their elegant appearance, clematis vines are a delightful addition to outdoor spaces, creating a visually appealing and enchanting atmosphere. Whether adorning a fence or climbing a trellis, these blossoms bring a touch of natural grace to your surroundings.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-11
  • Size: Varies by species (typically 6 to 15 feet)
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Bloom Season: Spring to fall, depending on the variety

4. Verbena

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Verbena proves to be an excellent addition to summer gardens, with the remarkable ability to withstand both high temperatures and drought conditions. Flourishing in less-than-perfect soils, these plants thrive as long as they receive ample sunlight and the soil offers efficient drainage.

Even in challenging conditions, verbena showcases resilience and adds vibrant colors to your garden. To ensure a continuous display of flowers, a simple trim of about one-fourth of the plant is beneficial when blooms start to dwindle.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 7-11
  • Size: 6 to 18 inches tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Season: Spring to fall

5. Pansies

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Pansies are well-liked flowers in gardens, but they don't last very long. Usually treated as annuals outside their hardiness zones, they enjoy cooler weather and can handle frosts.

In warmer areas, people plant them in the fall, and they stay through winter, blooming from spring to early summer. Pansies are not very tall or wide, usually staying under a foot, but they have big, colorful flowers that pop up in spring. The flowers are flat and about 2 inches wide.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-8
  • Size: 6 to 9 inches tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Bloom Season: Early spring to early summer

6. Iris

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Iris flowers are unique with two kinds of petals - outer ones that hang down and inner, smaller ones that stand tall, creating an intriguing overall shape. These flowers bloom in late spring or early summer, catching the attention of butterflies and hummingbirds.

To keep them looking fresh, it's good to remove the spent blooms, a process known as deadheading. Once the fall frost arrives, it's recommended to trim back the foliage. This helps the plant prepare for the winter months and ensures a healthy return of these captivating blooms in the following spring.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-9
  • Size: 1 to 3 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Bloom Season: Late spring to early summer

7. Morning Glories

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Morning glories are beloved annual vines, cherished for their rapid growth and vibrant trumpet-shaped flowers. These low-maintenance plants don't demand pruning or deadheading to maintain their beauty.

Whether sprawling along the ground or climbing a support structure, they add charm to gardens. Expect colorful blooms in summer and fall, and water weekly if there's no rainfall. However, be cautious as morning glories can become invasive in certain regions.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 2-11 (depends on the variety)
  • Size: Varies by species (typically 6 to 10 feet)
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Season: Summer to fall

8. Cosmos

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Cosmos flowers are delightful blooms that grace gardens all summer, thriving even in less-than-perfect soil. Sporting stunning, vivid purple shades, they add a burst of color to your outdoor space.

What makes them even more appealing is their unique trait; the more you trim or cut them, the quicker and taller they grow. This feature not only allows for continuous blooming but also encourages robust growth.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 2-11 (depends on the variety)
  • Size: 2 to 6 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Season: Summer to fall

9. Coneflowers

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Coneflowers, resembling daisies with their tough yet charming nature, boast a vibrant purple hue that graces gardens throughout the summer. Known for their resilience, they thrive in dry soil and adapt to various climates, making them a garden essential.

These flower gems serve as magnets for butterflies, enhancing the natural allure of your outdoor space. In a spectrum of purples, the 'Magnus cultivar' stands out with its bright pink-purple brilliance.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-9
  • Size: 2 to 5 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to light shade
  • Bloom Season: Summer to fall

10. Asters

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Asters take the spotlight as a fall favorite, displaying a spectrum of purple hues ranging from amethyst to burgundy, alongside shades of pink, white, and yellow. These flowers are a magnet for late-season pollinators, including bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.

With their diverse color palette, asters contribute to the autumn landscape, creating a visually appealing and lively outdoor space. Whether you prefer the rich tones of purple or the soft shades of pink and yellow, asters provide a colorful and welcoming transition.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-8
  • Size: 1 to 6 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Bloom Season: Late summer to fall

11. Crocuses

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Crocuses, the heralds of spring, bring bursts of color to gardens in March and April. These small plants boast star-shaped blooms, staying close to the ground. Resembling blades of grass with a light stripe down the center, their foliage adds a touch of elegance.

To keep them healthy, make sure the soil isn't too wet, as crocuses don't like soggy conditions that could lead to rot. With their charming appearance and early arrival, crocuses are a delightful addition to gardens.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-8
  • Size: 3 to 6 inches tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Bloom Season: Early spring

12. Alliums

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Alliums, part of the onion family, grace gardens with stunning perennial blooms in late spring and early summer, lasting about a week. Known for their striking beauty, these flowers are hassle-free to care for, making them a favorite choice for many gardeners.

With their unique and eye-catching appearance, these flowers add a touch of charm to the garden landscape, creating a visually pleasing display during their short-lived but delightful flowering period.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-9
  • Size: 6 inches to 3 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Season: Late spring to early summer

13. Catmint

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Catmint, a perennial herb in the mint family, is a spreading plant that works well along paths or as a border in gardens. Throughout the summer, it graces the landscape with delicate purple flowers.

This hardy plant not only adds visual appeal to your garden but also offers a practical solution by keeping certain pests at bay. Its resilient nature and continuous blooming make catmint a sought-after choice, contributing both beauty and functionality to outdoor spaces with minimal effort.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-8
  • Size: 1 to 2 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Bloom Season: Late spring to early summer

14. Lobelia

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Lobelia is a plant that flowers from summer until the first frost. There are many kinds of lobelia, but the ones with trailing blue or purple flowers are usually called Lobelia erinus. Lobelia flowers have five petals, and some have white centers.

The good thing about them is you don't have to remove the old flowers because they clean themselves. If they look tired from the heat, you can make them feel better by cutting them back and giving them regular water.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 2-10 (depends on the variety)
  • Size: 6 inches to 3 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Bloom Season: Summer to fall

15. Hydrangea

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Hydrangeas are popular plants in gardens because they have flowers in lots of colors, like purple. Some kinds have big, round bunches of flowers, while others have smaller, flatter ones.

However, you need to care for hydrangeas properly; water them at least once a week unless it has rained, but be careful not to let them sit in very wet soil. Also, the color of the flowers can change depending on the kind of soil they're in. So, if you want to make sure they have the color you like, you might need to check the soil.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-9 (depends on the variety)
  • Size: 3 to 6 feet tall (varies by species)
  • Sun Exposure: Part sun to part shade
  • Bloom Season: Summer to fall

16. Lilac

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Lilac bushes are well-loved plants known for their beautiful purple flowers. These bushes, which lose their leaves in winter, produce clusters of tiny flowers in mid- to late spring. The flowers smell really sweet, and the leaves can be blue-green or gray-green.

Once these shrubs have settled in, they don't need a lot of attention. It's a good idea to trim them a bit after the flowers are done blooming to keep things tidy. If you live in a warmer area, you can find newer types of lilacs that will do well in your climate.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-7
  • Size: 5 to 15 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Season: Spring

17. Wisteria

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Wisteria is a plant that climbs and can grow really long. It has deep green leaves and in the spring, it blooms with sweet-smelling purple flowers on hanging stems. 

After the flowers, it gets slim, smooth seed pods. To help it grow nicely, give it something strong to climb on, like a trellis or post. One thing to watch out for is that a type called Chinese wisteria can spread too much in some places. If that's a concern in your area, you might want to go for American wisteria instead.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-9 (depends on the variety)
  • Size: 10 to 30 feet tall (varies by species)
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Bloom Season: Spring to early summer

18. Delphiniums

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Delphiniums are tall plants often seen in cottage gardens. The 'Black Knight' kind has spiky flowers in a bold dark purple, adding a striking touch to gardens. These plants stick around for a few years, usually no more than three or four.

Blooms come in clusters along the stem from June to July and sometimes again in the fall. But be careful because delphiniums are toxic, so it's best not to plant them where there are kids or pets around.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-7 (depends on the variety)
  • Size: 2 to 8 feet tall (varies by species)
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Bloom Season: Late spring to early summer

19. Pacific Rhododendron

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Pacific rhododendron shrubs are tall and boast attractive bell-shaped flowers during the spring and summer. With evergreen foliage, these hardy plants don't demand highly fertile soil; they thrive in relatively low-nutrient conditions.

Despite their resilience, maintaining consistent soil moisture is crucial, requiring a regular watering schedule. However, it's equally important to ensure proper drainage, as overly wet soil can harm these shrubs.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-9
  • Size: 5 to 15 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Part shade to full shade
  • Bloom Season: Late spring to early summer

20. Bougainvillea

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Bougainvillea is a group of tropical vines that are really colorful. They can spread on the ground or be trained to climb on things like trellises or fences. In warm places, the leaves stay green all year. The big, bright flowers come and go with the seasons.

It's important to be careful when dealing with these plants because they have thorns. So, if you want a lively and vibrant addition to your garden, bougainvillea is a great choice.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 9-11 (typically grown as an annual in cooler zones)
  • Size: 3 to 30 feet tall (varies by species)
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Season: Spring to fall (varies by species)

21. Impatiens

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Impatiens are easy to grow and great for adding lots of bright colors to shady areas in your yard. These are annual flowers, meaning they last for one season, and you can find them in many different colors. You can plant them in containers or on the ground, and they do well in shady spots. 

Unlike some other plants that like shade but mostly have green leaves, impatiens have lots of soft petals in various colors, making them stand out and.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 10-11 (typically grown as annuals in cooler zones)
  • Size: 6 inches to 2 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Shade to part shade
  • Bloom Season: Summer to fall

22. Tulips

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Tulips are pretty flowers that make gardens and bouquets happy in spring. They're great for all kinds of gardeners because tulips are easy to take care of. There are lots of different kinds of tulips, each with its special charm for gardens at home.

These flowers are grouped into different types based on these things, so you can explore and find the ones that match what you like and how your garden is set up.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-8
  • Size: 6 inches to 2 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Bloom Season: Spring